Chair of Saint Peter novena begins on February 14

As some of the readers of this blog know, I have been volunteering over the past ten years for a developing lay apostolate at the service of Catholic priests and bishops: The Christopher Inn International.

Chair of Saint PeterOn Thursday, February 14, 2019, the team of The Christopher Inn International will begin a novena in honor of the Chair of Saint Peter, which is celebrated each year as a feast day on February 22nd.

February 22, 2019 will also mark the 19th anniversary of the incorporation of The Christopher Inn International as a non-profit organization.

Please consider joining in prayer for God’s blessing on this developing apostolate. To do so, simply pray the following each day, beginning on February 14 and concluding on February 22:

O Holy Apostle,
because you are the rock upon which Almighty God has built His church,
obtain for me, I pray you:
firm hope and burning love;
complete detachment from myself;
contempt of the world;
patience in adversity;
humility in prosperity;
recollection in prayer;
purity of heart;
a right intention in all my works;
diligence in fulfilling the duties of my state of life;
constancy in my resolutions;
resignation to the will of God; and
perseverance in the grace of God even unto death;
that so, by means of your intercession and your glorious merits,
I may be made worthy to appear before the chief and eternal shepherd of souls,
Jesus Christ,
who with the Father and the Holy Spirit
lives and reigns forever.
Amen.

20th anniversary of Act One: Writing for Hollywood

Today (January 25, 2019) marks the 20th anniversary of the Act One program.

Below, I’m linking to a fascinating interview with Barbara Nicolosi Harrington about the origins of Act One, in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of its founding.

Act One became an important part of my own story when I participated in the 30-day Chicago Act One writing program in the summer of 2002. I’m so grateful to Barbara and everyone else who made it possible for the program to exist, and for me to attend. (For example, my boss at the time not only gave me 30 days off to attend the program, but also covered my tuition). I’m also grateful for all of the extraordinary friends I made via the program and the subsequent move to Hollywood.

It seems fitting that Act One was launched on January 25, the feast of the Conversion of Saint Paul. It also falls during the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity. As Barbara describes in the interview, Act One has become a beautiful example of inter-denominational cooperation and common mission.

Also, I know that Saint Paul is one of Barbara’s patron saints. She was a member of the Daughters of Saint Paul for nine years. As a result, there’s certainly a bit of the ardor of Saint Paul in her. Check out this prayer she once wrote: Christians and Media: A Prayer for Forgiveness.

Please consider making a donation to Act One by clicking here.

 

Juan de la Cruz

Cross_iconIt’s the feast day of St. John of the Cross, one of my favorite spiritual writers of all time. (Doesn’t sound very detached, does it? Still working on that nada doctrine.)

I’ve created a multimedia retreat with Saint John of the Cross — and his Sayings of Light and Lovehere. It works well on mobile devices… such as tablets and smartphones.

Also, I did a series of posts on John of the Cross during Lent of 2004. Here are the links:

Lenten retreat starts

Prologue to The Dark Night

Why is the dark night necessary?

pride

avarice

lust

anger

gluttony

envy and sloth

one dark night…

discernment of the night of the senses

how to respond to being placed in the dark night

fired with love’s urgent longings

on All Souls’ Day: some thoughts on Christian hope

Carracci-PurgatoryA few thoughts from Pope Benedict XVI’s encyclical letter Spe Salvi (On Christian Hope):

The belief that love can reach into the afterlife, that reciprocal giving and receiving is possible, in which our affection for one another continues beyond the limits of death—this has been a fundamental conviction of Christianity throughout the ages and it remains a source of comfort today. Who would not feel the need to convey to their departed loved ones a sign of kindness, a gesture of gratitude or even a request for pardon? Now a further question arises: if “Purgatory” is simply purification through fire in the encounter with the Lord, Judge and Savior, how can a third person intervene, even if he or she is particularly close to the other? When we ask such a question, we should recall that no man is an island, entire of itself. Our lives are involved with one another, through innumerable interactions they are linked together. No one lives alone. No one sins alone. No one is saved alone. The lives of others continually spill over into mine: in what I think, say, do and achieve. And conversely, my life spills over into that of others: for better and for worse. So my prayer for another is not something extraneous to that person, something external, not even after death. In the interconnectedness of Being, my gratitude to the other—my prayer for him—can play a small part in his purification. And for that there is no need to convert earthly time into God’s time: in the communion of souls simple terrestrial time is superseded. It is never too late to touch the heart of another, nor is it ever in vain. In this way we further clarify an important element of the Christian concept of hope. Our hope is always essentially also hope for others; only thus is it truly hope for me too (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1032). As Christians we should never limit ourselves to asking: how can I save myself? We should also ask: what can I do in order that others may be saved and that for them too the star of hope may rise? Then I will have done my utmost for my own personal salvation as well.